Online physio
Online physiotherapy for musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries and sports injuries


back pain, lower back pain, online physiotherapy, Hip Pain, prehab, post-op rehab, osteoarthritis issues, sports injuries, elbow pain, tennis elbow, golfers elbow, child physiotherapy, adolescent physio, teenager physio, knee pain, ACL injury, knee sprain...Visit the NHS Pain Management Web Site

​ Neck pain is a common problem and most cases are not caused by a serious problem.

What are the symptoms? Pain around the neck is the most obvious symptom but it can be referred into the shoulders, shoulder blade area or to the face and head - this can vary from an intermittent ache to a more severe sharp pain. Frequently joint stiffness and tense muscles limit the movement of your neck and headaches are a common result of longstanding neck irritation. If a cervical nerve is irritated in the neck area, you may feel pain and/or numbness/pins and needles in your arm and hand. Dizziness and feeling light headed can also be a symptom of neck strain. 


 (See          Red Flag Section for further information on symptoms)​

Why do I have back Neck Pain? The cause of this pain can be obvious like an accident, spondylosis (spinal arthritis) or more subtle when related to a repetitive task or prolonged positions. Also anxiety and stress can cause tension in neck and spinal muscles. Head and neck movements when eyesight is deteriorating or the wearing of varifocal glasses. These and many other stresses can affect all ages from young children to adults. The popularity of laptops, electronic gaming and texting has led to an increase in teenagers experiencing neck pain. Cervical joints that are already affected by wear and tear are particularly susceptible to strain.
 

Our Physiotherapists can help diagnose your symptoms and have you back on the road to recovery in no time

Online physiotherapy for back pain, lower back pain, online physiotherapy, Hip Pain, prehab, post-op rehab, osteoarthritis issues, sports injuries, elbow pain, tennis elbow, golfers elbow, child physiotherapy, adolescent physio, teenager physio, knee pain, ACL injury, knee sprain

          Red Flag Alert: What Symptoms may be Cause for Concern?

  • Regular movement is key to recovery so gently move your neck often as pain permits — avoid keeping your neck completely still and do not wear a collar, you need to allow your muscles chance to regain strength through movement.
  • Relax: One technique is to relax and ‘let go’ of the muscles around your neck letting your shoulders gently drop as you breathe out.  Tension should be avoided so be aware if you are clenching your teeth! 
  • Take regular breaks from using computers — Avoid looking at screens offset or for too long 
  • Reduce your anxiety and stress levels, take time to unwind  and maybe try using a heat pack around your neck, following any instructions carefully to avoid burning yourself!
  • Over the counter painkillers that work for you can be taken - relieving the pain can help to relax muscles and allow you to move your neckmore frequently


If you are unsure of concerned about your back pain then contact one of our Physiotherapists who can help diagnose your condition and put together a recovery plan with a specific exercise regime and personalised advice.​

Neck Pain

Neck Pain Explained

What to do About Neck Pain 

First of all, don' t worry! For the vast majority of problems there is no special cause for concern other than treating the problem you are experiencing. Typically first stop is to book a session with your PFO physiotherapist who will make an assessment. We are formally trained in diagnosis which can, at times, uncover symptoms that need further investigation by your GP.


For example, you may experience:

  • A lack of coordination(for example; finding fiddly tasks increasingly difficult)
  • Problems walking
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control
  • A high temperature (fever)
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Radiating left sided chest pain


If you have any of these symptoms you should seek an appointment with your GP as soon as possible